Filling up your gas tank in recent months is like seeing the bill for your toddler’s birthday party – “how much?” For a smooth family life, however, both must be paid.

Most women I have worked with would prefer solutions that don’t single them out by gender.  Traditionally, the financial community’s approach to working with women has been patriarchal and patronizing.

Inflation and interest rates have been the talk of the town in recent weeks. These are issues far-beyond our control with central banks all around the world scrambling to adjust and control them.

Intergenerational wealth, on our TV screens at least, conjures images of Succession’s Logan Roy dismissing one of his weasel kids with a sneer and expletive. Roy, the fearsome patriarch, who built his business from nothing, watches in disgust as the heirs to his throne – who do no work of any note – connive and backstab in an effort to win the keys to more money and power.

Today, more teens are employed than they have been in over a decade. As of May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows unemployment rates for ages 16-19 among the lowest in the past 68 years. That’s good news for anyone contemplating the next generation of leaders – and for our economy.

We have been told that money doesn’t buy happiness since time immemorial. And yet, we still pursue wealth with longing and determination; sacrificing sleep, health, relationships and time.

As many of my clients know, I worked at a provincial office that managed the money of Ontarians who lacked mental capacity before embarking on private practice.

Wedding season is upon us. Money management is so foundational to a successful relationship that it is often the leading cause of divorce.

Higher interest rates may be unpleasant but banks have been bracing us for this trend for some time as evidenced by the stress-tests imposed on mortgages.

This article explains financial planning perfectly. If we use the medical analogy, a fee-for-service planner is like your family doctor or general practitioner.